Billions of tons of carbon in the Deep Earth pose no threat to human health

A deep living biosphere under the Earth’s crust contains a mass of carbon “245 to 385 times greater than the carbon mass of all humans on the surface,” say scientists who are busy pumping toxic greenhouse gases into that subterranean ecosystem to save the planet.

Less than 10 years ago no one even knew life could exist three miles down. Today, scientists are using deep-drilling techniques — similar to those used in the “fracking” of shale oil — to understand just how much CO2 humans can pump into the Earth without causing a catastrophic rejection event.

Rick Colwell, a scientist at Oregon State University, says we “do not yet know all the ways in which deep subsurface life affects surface life and vice versa [but] for now, we can only marvel at the nature of the metabolisms that allow life to survive under theĀ  for life in deep Earth.”

It’s like exploring the Amazon rainforest, some say. “There is life everywhere, and everywhere there’s an awe-inspiring abundance of unexpected and unusual organisms,” says Mitch Sogin, co-chair of a “Deep Life community” of more than 300 researchers in 34 countries.

None of the “zombie bacteria” or “microbial dark matter” are thought to pose any threat or benefit to human health, and 97% of Deep Life scientists agree that the benefits of “carbon sequestration” greatly outweigh the risks of polluting the nearly impenetrable biosphere with the toxic product of human energy production.


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