Study: Children with ‘lazy eye’ benefit most when both eyes treated equally

Amblyopia_Boy

The largest clinical study of “lazy eye” ever conducted by the National Institutes of Health has confirmed that children with the condition benefit the most when both eyes are treated equally.

The medical condition known as “amblyopia” occurs when the eyes and the brain refuse to work together in unity, causing one eye to become weaker than the other. Traditional treatments are focused on making the “lazy” eye work harder by putting a patch over the “strong” eye, but the NIH study tested a different hypothesis.

“We do want all children to have visual equity,” said Dr. Sam Ness, lead scientist on the project. “But our research,¬†which followed 3,000 children in 17 states for six months, found that kids with two weak eyes care more about their fellow human beings than children with two strong eyes.”

By patching both eyes of children in the control group for up to six hours a day, doctors found that the parts of the brain involved in moral reasoning developed a stronger sense of fairness and social justice.

“Forcing the lazy eye to get stronger reinforces the brain’s tendency toward structural exceptionalism,” said Dr. Ness, “which is not the outcome that modern science demands.”

One side effect of the new approach is that neither eye can focus “normally” – whatever that means – but doctors are confident that countering the draconian narcissistic tendencies of the “visually abled” will produce a society more resistant to extremism.

 

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