NAACP spins up African American Airlines, taps Jesse Jackson for CEO

African-American-Airlines-Boeing-777-300

A Boeing 777-300 from African American Airlines takes off from Bismarck, North Dakota.

In the wake of a nationwide travel advisory by the NAACP citing “disrespectful, discriminatory or unsafe conditions” for African Americans traveling on American Airlines, the famed civil rights organization has moved decisively to curb such abuses by starting up its own airline.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson, who has been named CEO of the new African American Airlines, said the move was prompted by alarming behavior from American Airlines personnel.

The NAACP says it has “been monitoring a pattern of disturbing incidents reported by African-American passengers, specific to American Airlines” that suggests “a corporate culture of racial insensitivity and possible racial bias.”

“In many ways, it’s like the oppression we face in sports,” said Jackson. “We went from picking cotton balls to picking footballs and basketballs without freedom. Now, highly-paid national leaders of The Resistance who have vaginas between their legs can’t even fly American without crying and getting nationwide press attention.”

“That’s harassment,” Jackson said. “That’s illegal.”

Jackson’s “vagina” comment was a reference to Tamika Mallory, one of the women named in the NAACP complaint and co-chair of the Women’s “PussyHat” March on Washington. The former executive director of Al Sharpton’s National Action Network, Mallory is a single mother who lost her son’s father to gun violence when he was beaten and shot by drug dealers.

“Mallory is a nasty woman who was singled out, disrespected, and intimidated by nasty male aggression,” Jackson said. “She was given a middle seat when she asked for an aisle seat. That’s just like being sent to the back of the bus, and her response to that aggression was completely appropriate.”

American Airlines has agreed to meet with NAACP representatives, but Jackson said “that ship has sailed.”

“We as a people are determined to be separate but equal again,” he said. “That’s why I agreed to serve as CEO of African American Airlines.”

 

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