California cities compete for second Cosby mistrial

News that Bill Cosby’s first trial on sexual assault charges ended in a hung jury and only cost $219,000 – mostly due to overtime for deputies, detectives, security guards and court personnel – has some California cities clamoring to host the retrial.

“The cost to benefit ratio is excellent,” said Robert Rizzo, the former city manager of Bell, a sleepy little suburb in Los Angeles County known for having higher property taxes than Beverly Hills. “I’ve already spoken to the judge and prosecutor, and I think we’re in a good position to get their business.”

Bell’s former assistant manager Angela Spaccia said her city could use the positive publicity. “I remember how good O.J.’s trial was for Los Angeles,” she said. “The citizens of Bell won’t let Cosby down.”

IMG_003_PE_R_BEAUMONT7_0_1_1_NNIBBVJ.jpg

The Magnificent Seven of Beaumont attend a court hearing in Riverside on Aug. 16, 2016. They are Francis Dennis Coe Jr., Joseph Sandy Aklufi, William Kevin Aylward, Ernest Alois Egger, Deepak Moorjani, David Willliam Dillon, and Alan Charles Kapanicas, left to right. Photo: The Press-Enterprise.

A few miles east in Beaumont, a group known locally as The Magnificent Seven issued a press release saying they, too, would be seeking to host the new Cosby trial.

Beaumont’s former chief of police, Francis Dennis Coe Jr., told The Brie that Bell would definitely not beat them out. “The seven of us know how the system works, and we know how to beat it,” he said. “We’re going to get that trial come hell or high water. It’s the least we can do for the public employees of Beaumont.”

Correction: The Brie‘s editor was on vacation in Europe when this article was first published. We have since discovered that Rizzo spoke to our reporter from prison, where he is serving 12 years on 69 counts of corruption; Spaccia is on house arrest after being released from prison on a technicality in her 2013 public corruption case; and Coe has pleaded not guilty to corruption charges and has waived his right to a speedy trial. Other than that, we stand by the story.

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